Randomize: All the Triangles


Update your color pie and click ‘Re-generate’ to create a random design. Best supported on a desktop/laptop (the save functionality is not supported by up to date iPhones). Read more details about this blog post below!

Re-generate Save Image

The Color Pie

Click a color in the pie to reduce it. Click a square color below to increase that color (keep clicking for more).


A handful of people have asked me for patterns for a couple quilt designs (this one and this one) that I created via random code. Oh, and don’t forget an original cross stitch design here! Today I’m sharing my randomizing tool used to generate the designs for these quilts.

A Very Brief History

I originally worked on this little project when I participated in the Libs Elliott swap. I started down the path of working through the tutorial that Libs’ recommends on her site, only to realize that I already have coding expertise (HTML, CSS, JS, D3.js, SVG) to work on a similar approach without needing to learn new technologies! So, I did it, mostly when then baby Ingrid would be slow to fall asleep in the evenings on my laptop. And then I made the quilts and cross stitch.

How to Make a Quilt

If you would like to make a quilt from an image you create, I suggest dropping it into a program that allows you to overlay a 12×12 grid. Or print it out and draw a 12×12 grid on top of it. Once you have a grid overlayed, you will see that each of the 144 squares in the grid is made up of three types of squares (a solid color, a half-square triangle, or a half-square triangle combo). Then, you would piece each square at your desired size (accounting for seam allowances), and then piece them together to make your quilt top! If I have time in the future, I’ll show more examples on this process.

A Very Brief Conclusion

This code algorithm is a little different than Libs’ quilt designs, but is definitely in the spirit of her work in mixing technology and tactile creations. My tool features Kona Colors, but I’m open to publishing future posts using a different set of solids (or maybe even *gasp* patterned fabric!). I’ve experimented with sizes and different shapes, so stay tuned for alternative algorithms in the future!

Although I’m not asking for attribution on any creations using this code, I wouldn’t mind a shout-out in the form of a link or an Instagram tag!

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